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Curtin University

Curtin University

Curtin Expectations for Academic Performance

A note from the Vice-Chancellor

Curtin is committed to enhancing its research and its teaching and learning achievements. Each and every staff member contributes to the overall performance of the University.  To progress and continually improve, it is essential that we each have a clear understanding of what we need to do individually and as part of the team.

Curtin Expectations for Academic Performance is one part of our strategy for clarifying how the strategic objectives of the University relate to the specific work that each of us undertakes. It provides a set of overarching Expectations for academic staff to guide the planning and assessing of our academic work.  Attaining these Expectations will help us achieve our vision.

These Expectations have undergone extensive consultation. They take into account the feedback we have received from across the University resulting in a document which we believe will act as a useful guide to academics and their managers.

I am pleased to present to the Curtin academic community Curtin’s Expectations for Academic Performance.

Professor Jeanette Hacket
Vice Chancellor

Introduction

Curtin Expectations for Academic Performance (CEAP) guides continual improvement and career development to academic staff through its five overarching Expectations:
• Effective teaching and learning
• Effective honours and HDR supervision
• High quality and / or high impact research output
• Leadership that effectively promotes Curtin’s strategic directions
• Service that effectively contributes to Curtin’s strategic directions

This guidance occurs through the Work Planning and Performance Review (WPPR) process. The growth in performance is recognised and rewarded through promotions.

These overarching Expectations lay the basis for achievable individualised objectives to be set in the yearly PMP work plan that directly relate to the individual’s duties. These objectives are to reflect Curtin and the area’s overall strategic direction, and focus on the quality of outcomes and / or the progress of work within given timeframes.  They may include quantitatively based objectives, such as target eVALUate scores, the number and destination of publications to be submitted, and the number and type of grants to be achieved, as well as qualitatively based objectives, such as the establishment of key partnerships, the redesign of a unit or the implementation of a new initiative.

In developing individualised objectives, line managers and their staff are encouraged to examine the key performance targets in the University and faculty plans, the school/area plans, the typical research performance of the area, and the typical student satisfaction rates as shown through the eVALUate University Aggregated Reports (http://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/reports/uni_report.cfm).

In recognition of the varying mixes of teaching, research and administrative duties carried out by different academics, individualised objectives are not set across all the Expectations. Line managers allocate duties to individuals according to area needs as well as staff strengths, level of appointment and career aspirations. Duties and objectives are also set to support staff growth into a higher level of duties and performance, thus enhancing prospects of promotion.

Providing sufficient time and opportunities to achieve an individual’s objectives is a key requirement of CEAP.  Line managers and academic staff are informed by the workload allocation methods in use, policies and programs for staff development, support and resources available to achieve aims, and on-balance judgement. Where sufficient time, resources or opportunities cannot be made available to achieve an objective, then it will need to be revised accordingly.
 
During review, discussion and feedback is to take place about the academic’s work in relation to the objectives that had been set during the planning phase and subsequent contextual factors. Through review, formal recognition is provided for good work, feedback is given for reflection and improvement of performance, the need for further support and development is determined, and readiness for promotion is discussed.

This use of CEAP as part of the PMP process is intended to add to discussions about work, future directions, career development and the support required to achieve these.

The Expectations

1. Effective teaching and learning

The expectation “Effective Teaching and Learning” applies to all modes of teaching,  teaching support activities and programs whether part of a degree, a training program or short course (e.g. for industry). It is demonstrated by achievement of the expected outcomes listed below.

Expected outcomes

These outcomes apply as appropriate to the level of appointment, duties undertaken, context and discipline:
• A high level of student satisfaction for teaching / units / courses
• Optimal student achievement in units / courses
• Well designed and delivered learning experiences, assessment and feedback to students
• Well designed and delivered courses / curriculum / programs / initiatives
• Units / courses / curriculum / programs / initiatives satisfy the requirements of stakeholders and accreditation bodies

Table 1 lists the types of teaching duties appropriate to each level of appointment. Teaching staff may have a mix of duties which includes some of the types of duties that distinguish their level and some of the types of duties of the levels below.

Table 1: Types of teaching duties appropriate to level

Level

Types of teaching duties may include:

E

Distinguished scholarship* and contribution in teaching and learning at all levels, nationally or internationally. Leadership in maintenance of academic standards AND

D

Development of curriculum / programs of study. Significant scholarship * in teaching and learning locally or nationally AND

C

Course / year / program co-ordination. Scholarship* in teaching and learning AND

B

Undergraduate and postgraduate unit co-ordination. Postgraduate lecturing, tutoring, demonstrating, clinical supervision, fieldwork and associated activities AND

A

Undergraduate lecturing, tutoring, demonstrating, clinical supervision, fieldwork and associated activities.

* Scholarship refers to research on, evaluation of or reflection on teaching and learning that results in improvement to practice. It includes communicating good practice to others.

2. High quality and/or high impact research / creative works

The expectation of “High quality and/or high impact research / creative works” applies to all research and creative production and is demonstrated by achievement of the expected outcomes.

Expected research / creative works outcomes
These outcomes apply as appropriate to the level of appointment, duties undertaken, context and discipline
• High quality, impact and number of publications / creative works / exhibitions
• High quality, impact and value of consultancies, grants and commissions
• Creation of a vibrant, engaging research / creative work collegiate environment

3. Effective Honours and HDR supervision

The expectation of “Effective Honours and HDR supervision” is demonstrated by participation in the supervision process and achievement of the expected outcomes.

Expected supervision outcomes
These outcomes apply as appropriate to the level of appointment, duties undertaken, context and discipline
• Students complete within the agreed time
• Students are supervised to a successful examination outcome
• A high level of student satisfaction with the supervision process
• Students are assisted to progress their research career

Table 2 lists the types of research / creative works and supervision duties appropriate to each level of appointment. Research / creative works staff may have a mix of duties which includes some of the types of duties that distinguish their level and some of the types of duties of the levels below.

Table 2: Types of research / creative work / supervision duties appropriate to level

Level

Types of research/creative works duties may include:

E

Responsible for research / creative works of a recognised international calibre / a leading authority. Fostering research / creative work of others AND

D

Responsible for research / creative works of a recognised national calibre AND

C

Supervision of Hons, Masters & PhD research projects AND

B

Conducting research / creative works

A

Conducting research / creative works


4. Leadership that effectively promotes Curtin’s strategic directions

Leadership that effectively promotes Curtin’s strategic directions” is demonstrated by achievement of the expected outcomes listed below. These apply whether leadership is demonstrated in research, teaching, administration, management or service.

Expected Outcomes

These outcomes are to be considered in relation to Curtin’s strategic plan and apply as appropriate to the level of appointment, duties undertaken, context and discipline
• Development of staff, students and/or area
• Positive growth in Curtin’s reputation locally / nationally / internationally  
• Significant improvements made in unit / course / team / initiative / area / profession
• A shared vision and mutual trust

Table 3 lists the types of duties involving leadership appropriate to level of appointment. Staff in leadership roles may have a mix of duties which includes some of the types of duties that distinguish their level and some of the types of duties of the levels below.

Table 3: Types of leadership duties appropriate to level

Level

Types of duties involving leadership may include:

E

Management/leadership of a large organisational unit, a university wide initiative, policy development, community affairs, excellence in teaching / research; international recognition, capacity building AND

D

Management/leadership of an organisational unit, a large team, a Faculty (Division) wide initiative; Mentoring of colleagues AND

C

Management/leadership of  a team, a school wide initiative, a course, a year group; Mentoring of students AND

B

Management/leadership of teaching units, sessional staff AND

A

Development of own teaching / research / professional expertise / creative works


5. Service that effectively contributes to Curtin’s strategic directions

The expectation “Service that effectively contributes to Curtin’s strategic directions” applies to the contributions that an individual makes to an organisational unit, initiative or issue within the University, the discipline, the profession or the community. This can include, for example, contributions to committees, working parties, editorial boards, conference organisation, advisory boards, professional and academic organisations, the media and other similar bodies. It is demonstrated by achievement of the expected outcomes listed below.

Expected outcomes

These outcomes are considered in relation to Curtin’s strategic directions and apply as appropriate to the level of appointment, duties undertaken, context and discipline
• Good quality contributions provided in an efficient and timely manner
• Achievement of significant outcomes in policy / services / practices / programs / reputation / partnerships

Table 4 lists the type of service duties appropriate to each level of appointment. Staff may have a mix of duties which includes some of the types of duties that distinguish their level and some of the types of duties of the levels below.

Table 4: Types of service duties appropriate to level .

Level

Types of duties involving service may include:

E

Significant service to both the University and the community AND

D

Significant service to the University, profession, discipline AND

C

Service to the profession, the Faculty AND

B

Service to the academic unit and its functioning AND

A

Service to own areas of teaching / research